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Subject:Bobwhite Escapee or wild?
From:Frank Gosiak <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Frank Gosiak <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Thu, 10 Nov 2011 19:56:14 -0600
Content-Type:text/plain

I have a little trouble with this wild versus non-wild philosophy. I am not 
getting down on Paul or supporting Bob, just trying to make a point. Peregrines 
were introduced back to our State and placed in boxes on towers that were 
not here when they previously resided, but, we count them. Ospreys were 
reintroduced and most (maybe all) were not even from the indigenous 
population. Greater Prairie Chickens are set up to establish new lech's (forgive 
spelling if incorrect) in previously established areas. Do I count them or not and 
when and where. Trumpeter Swans may or may not be released. And the on 
going Whooping Crane dilemma. Probably the majority are farm raised under the 
guise of being "natural". At least their predecessors had a lot of human 
intervention and care. Not to natural. Beyond this, an Inca Dove found in Two 
Harbors, which is not a migratory bird  (maybe this one is a first), and showed 
up out of thin air (I counted that bird). My bet is it came in on a ship that had 
access to the Gulf off the Texas Coast.Very much human intervention. How do 
we know? An Inca dove rides a ship. Count it. A Crane flies from Wisconsin 
under its own power. We don't count it. Audubon shot his specimens and analyzed their innards to see what they ate. Maybe we should have shot the 
Inca Dove and analyzed what it ate to get to Minnesota? When does an 
escaped farm bird become classified as wild? How many generations? All 
questions no finger pointing. Pheasants, Starlings, House sparrows, Eurasian Collared Doves and many more. I'm just making a challenge and have not 
formed a total opinion, yet. I believe Paul when he says it is a hard task and 
thankless. Paul, I appreciate your endeavors. I got a really good thought from 
Bob Russel. Birding is down, we are not following the flocks (and the other 
names for groups) with a frenzy. Its a good time to find out what kind of 
birders we really are and check some of these areas that may hold a gem or 
two. Milt Blomberg and I went into the Larch stands in Morrison and Stearns 
two winters ago and came up with Black Backed Woodpeckers in almost all of 
them. Only a few records before that. Might be very surprised if a number of us 
approach this and come up with something that can be substantiated. We can 
be like scientists and not only be number counters. Just remember, I am not 
trying to stir up trouble (its not my nature unless if you talk to Milt Blomberg) I 
am only putting forth a question.  Frank Gosiak   Little Falls  Morrison County   

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