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November 2014

MOU-RBA@LISTS.UMN.EDU

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Sat, 29 Nov 2014 12:55:49 -0700
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As a bird photographer, I add my voice to Ken Vail in echoing his words 
of caution to those who do not respect the space of these beautiful wild 
birds. If you don't think it means you for some reason ("I had the 
landowner's permission"), please rethink your behavior anyway. I've 
watched many a person push the limits to get that better view or photo. 
I watch how my positioning affects the wildlife and take the longer shot 
rather than infringe on their comfort level.  I rely on the mou-net 
network to help me see amazing birds and thank you for your efforts.

On 11/25/2014 7:14 PM, Ken Vail wrote:
> Three Snowy Owls were still present this afternoon in the previously
> reported areas.  I'm amazed at how quickly people respond to the posting.
> There were 3 vehicles of birders looking at the owls two hours after my
> original post.
>
> I was, however, horrified to see someone carrying his camera and tripod
> chasing the pure white owl across the field to get his "money" shot.  When
> I last saw this owl it was 50 yards from the road; after the chase it was
> probably 500 yards.
>
> Reporting on these owls so that others may see these beautiful birds has
> been a labor of love for me the past few years but I am now considering
> keeping their presence to myself.
>
> Aside from the fact that he was probably trespassing (neighbors have called
> the police in the past rbecause of robberies in the area) he chased the owl
> hundreds of yards farther from the view of other birders who stayed on the
> road.  Snowy Owls are relatively tame birds and with patience close-up
> shots are possible and easy. This is one owl that may not be so tame in the
> future.
>
> Ken Vail
>
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