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Weekend exercise successfully targeted some species I'd missed earlier. At
Randolph Industrial Park, in the southernmost part of the field adjacent to
the church, there were singing Bobolink. Thanks to fellow birders I also
saw the Dickcissel who perched up and sang just across from the Bobolink
field, right after I'd started to depart ! As before, Meadowlarks,
Grasshopper Sparrows, and Kildeer were also vocal and visible, but I did
not stay to search out others.

Instead, the destination was Cannon River Wilderness East, to the southwest
of Northfield, to hike. This Rice County park was recently re-opened after
erosion caused a major land-slide across the opening part of its boardwalk
path. Immediately beyond the steep, descending stairway and along the
boardwalk that enters the main ravine, the Acadian Flycatcher could be
heard and seen, hunting fairly low, back and forth across the boardwalk. It
finally retreated to the west up into an intersecting ravine that is marked
off as private property.

Several erosion events have severely altered the trail that usually yields
Cerulean sightings. In order to attain the full walk around the bluff, you
either have to bushwhack and do some steep climbing on the south side of
the streambed, or hike the north side all the way to the Cannon, where the
bed is narrow enough to be crossed. I did the latter, listening intently
for Cerulean sound. On the way in  no sound wasdetected, but on the way out
 the buzzy, ascending calls were finally heard., just twice. There was not
the customary singing duel across the main ravine, but it was late in the
afternoon by then.  Viewing the birds will require another visit.

Linda Whyte

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