ISHPSSB members might be interested:

The Biology and Psychology of Moral Agency
William A. Rottschaefer, 1998, Cambridge University Press.

This important book brings recent findings and theories in biology and
psychology to bear on the fundamental question in ethics of what it
means to behave morally.  It explains how we acquire and put to work our
capacities to act morally, and how these capacities are reliable means
to achieving true moral beliefs, proper moral motivations, and
successful moral actions.

By presenting a complete model of moral agency based on contemporary
evolutionary theory, developmental biology and psychology, and social
cognitive theory, the book offers a unique perspective.  It will be read
with profit by a broad swathe of philosophers, as well as psychologists
and biologists.

It is well written, groundbreaking in its integration of three fields of
enquiry (biology, psychology, and philosophy), and superbly organized.
This book will be an important contribution to the important and
exciting research into the nature and grounding of morality.   Paul
Thompson (Professor of Biology and Philosophy, University of Toronto)

Contents:  I. Moral agency and scientific naturalism, II. The biological
bases of moral agency, III. The psychological bases of moral agency, IV.
A scientific naturalistic account of moral agency, V. Integrating a
personalistic and naturalistic view of moral agency.

--
Christian C. Young
Associate Professor
Department of History, Science, and Culture
Mount Angel Seminary, St. Benedict, Oregon   97373
Office phone:  (503) 845-3557
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